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Date: 8-7-2020
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The Global Consumers & Global Mergers & Acquisitions, population relocation. - PART 4 Isokratia Global

Merger and acquisition activities are reaching unprecedented levels as industries are consolidating on a global basis. Across countries, such actions become even more common. The realignment of companies is occurring faster than one could have imagined. Global monopolies and oligopolies are beginning to emerge. Examples here are the cases of Microsoft and Intel that are both on the verge of worldwide monopolies. At a national level there are rules and codes of practise to protect the consumer against monopolies and oligopolies. What about the protection of consumers outside the national frontiers.
No market is too far for the global consumer. Technological advancements give the freedom to consumers to buy from national, regional and global suppliers, irrespective of their location. New technology enables people to purchase from anywhere around the world. It enables people to get medical advice, or education anywhere in the country, the region or the globe.
The UK’s private health industry, in the 70s and 80s heavily relied on demand from other countries nearby, such as Europe, and the Middle East. Now we are witnessing a reverse flow where UK citizens buy health treatment from other countries such as Belgium, France, Germany, America, India and even smaller countries such as Cyprus, where surgery seems to be more affordable and waiting lists are non existent.

It is possible in the future that we will see the reverse of influx. Since the industrial revolution and especially during the 20th century, people were abandoning small rural locations, in favour of moving to big cities, just because they can find work more easily at the city. The reversing has already begun. New technologies in the future will enable more and more people to work from home, whilst maintaining daily and instant contact with their offices and or even factories. In the early months of 2003, the UK government is trying to make it an employee’s right to opt for flexible working hours and work from home, despite fierce opposition from employer’s associations. Will it happen?

My workaholic corporate bank mangers Sandra ( Barclays) has been working from home for a couple of years now. She finds it much more productive and less stressful. Less time wasted in road travelling during high traffic times and more cost effective to her employer Barclays Bank.

New technologies enable consumers to both buy and sell products and services from wherever they may be able to achieve better pricing, without having to go to high street shops or industrial areas. I see a time where a reversal of influx of population to cities may begin to happen, where people will begin to move out into villages, some of which may be completely abandoned now.

The same can happen in a wider frame with global dimensions. People move from country to country, from region to region. Live in one country and employed by a company from another country miles away. Live in a certain location during a working life and then migrate to a different location for retirement, within a country; within a region; within the globe.

I believe in a small way it has already started. A great example here is the state of Florida in America. I hear that a population of about 11 million people has more than doubled to something like 26 million now. ( Don’t quote me on these figures please they are unconfirmed but I believe them to be true). Americans are not the only ones relocating. All these will eventually have a global effect.
Read Next Globalisation of Consumer Buying Power

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